Do you currently have a well registered or permitted with the District but need more information? Below are some helpful tools to manage your current well.

NEW WELL

According to State Law, any water well must be registered with the groundwater conservation district it is located in. A better reason to register your well is so that you can receive any pertinent notices concerning large production well applications filed with the District, or in case notice needs to be delivered to possibly affected wells in the case of a contamination to groundwater resources in your area.

No, but it would be advantageous to inform the District of the change in ownership so that the District’s records are current. This will insure that appropriate notices intended for well owners reach you, the owner.

Any well located within the county of Rusk is within the District.

This information may be found on the well log for your well, which by law must be given to the owner of the well and filed with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation and also with the District. In most cases the District can provide the most accurate information concerning this question.

You may simply put “unknown” on the paperwork. The District’s staff will also be able to assist in many cases with this as well.

Basic water testing is readily available from area certified labs. It is the owners responsibility if they want this done and is good to have done to have baseline water quality results in the event of contamination influence of any kind.

Simply call the District’s office and answer a few very simple questions. In most instances the District is able to include your well in the program.

EXISTING WELL

According to state law, every groundwater district must have a management plan that is renewed every 5 years. The management plan serves as a guideline for the District in managing our groundwater resources. This plan is reviewed by TCEQ and TWDB.

The District is tax-based with minor fees associated with applications. You may find the District’s Fee Schedule here

Current permit holders receive reporting information via mail annually. It is District Rules that require submittal of groundwater production for any well that has the potential to produce over 25,000 gallons per day. These reports assist the District in understanding pumping effects during different climatic events and recoverability of the aquifer for better management of the groundwater resources.

Current exempt wells used in oil and gas production, exploration, fracturing, or rig supply or mining should receive reporting information via mail annually. It is District Rules that require submittal of groundwater production for these types of well uses and must be metered. These reports assist the District in understanding pumping effects during different climatic events and recoverability of the aquifer for better management of the groundwater resources.

If you are moving or if you bought property that already has a well, you will want to transfer the ownership with the Application for Existing Water Well Registration or Ownership Transfer.

If your well has never been registered with the District, as is required by State law and the added benefit of protection to your well, you will need to register your well with the Application for Existing Water Well Registration or Ownership Transfer.

Every 3 years a permitted well must go through a renewal process to verify current information of the well. Wells currently registered or permitted that plan to have an increase in groundwater production must go through an amendment process.

Any well utilized for oil and gas exploration, production, or rig activity, after 180 days of completion must go through the District’s well Transfer Inspection through District Rule 9.2.5 to verify no commingling of water zones and the well is of good structural integrity or the well must be plugged.